MARTEN TRAPPING IN NORWAY

by Albert Roura / Viernes, 23 agosto 2013 / Published in TRAPPING TECHNIQUES

MARTEN TRAPPING IN NORWAY

General information about Norwegian marten:

Marten (Martes martes) are found in forested areas throughout Norway. It is an accomplished climber who prefers areas with mature forest, preferably rich forest with stenurer. It is nocturnal and moves sometimes over great distances each night. Marten is known to follow fixed routes, so when you find marten tracks and trails on the snow, you should to know that there are  high probabilities that marten will return to exactly by the same place within a few weeks. That way you can catch marten putting out the traps in suitable places.

Main food of marten is small rodents and squirrels, but it eats among others also small birds and eggs. A study by University College Nord-Trøndelag in 2010 showed that marten is one of Min predators in this country. Increasing the breeding of marten may thus help to increase both, the number and size of forest birds litter in our forests.

Marten can be profitable for those who want to keep the fur itself, but also for who wants to sell it on. Approximately 25 percent of all marten caught in Norway are sold in Oslo Leather Auctions. Increasing demand of fur from China has contributed to the value of marten has risen by about 80 percent in recent months. The average price of undamaged marten sold to Oslo Leather Auctions is now almost NOK 500, -, prepared and dried.

Killing blow traps, drop deck trailers, flakes and falls cane which are allowed to catch Martens in Norway. Most widespread are all kind of types of conibear traps, used in different sets and Huge Traps. Marten is almost omnivorous, but baits and lures used most often come from deer’s species and birds, fish, and honey. Fragrances anise oil is also commonly used to attract marten. Especially when it’s freezing, fish, often salted or smoked, work well as bait. This is because fish emit odors that marten is able to detect well under the extreme cold.

Bjørn Sperrud

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